DIY Suncor Lifeline review

Thought I would do a quick review about the Suncor Lifeline kit we recently installed on Señora del Mar. We purchased the kits through sailrite.

Pretty easy diy install. I never asked, but I would wager a bet that it is more expensive to have someone do swaged fittings etc…

You can purchase the kits with or without gates. They did cost a bit more than I wanted to spend ($150 with gate per line), but it does seem like a quality product using 316SS. The wire was around an extra $30 per line for a 30′ boat.

We decided to go with 3/16 bare wire after learning that they last longer and are easier to inspect than the plastic sleeved. Water won’t being getting trapped under the sleeve.

 

Tools that I used were a hard wrench, adjustable wrench, and a Harbor Freight multi purpose cutter tool ($30) which worked great and is a lot less expensive than what I found anywhere else.

Not to much drama on this install, except that I lost a tiny copper compression fitting to the Lord of the Sea. Be very careful not to lose the small parts in the termination fitting or you will have to purchase a whole new SS fitting (bowing my head in shame). They are Not cheap. It would be great if they could throw in a couple of extra of these little buggers as they can easily be lost (are you hearing me Suncor?).

I would definetly recommend this diy product for those of you that know it is time to replace those lifelines. Good Luck and Happy Sailing!

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Until next time,
Señora del Mar 

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Stress cracks, welding’s and lifelines, oh my!

Stress cracks, welding’s and lifelines, oh my!

In the never ending preparation for fresh new deck paint, the stanchion stress cracks needed to be dealt with and repaired. Out came my trustee Harbour Freight mini dremel to dig out the cracks and fill them back with a fresh slop of gelcoat.

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It’s not usually a good sign when anything is covered up. You guessed it, something was covered up and it was 2 stanchion bases. A previous owner had placed a plastic board with silicone over cracked fiberglass.  He had filled the underneath with gelcoat. Oh what fun it was cleaning, removing gelcoat, grinding and laying down new fiberglass.

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Wait, that is not all. Is that a crack in the stanchion support welding’s? Nope, it’s several cracks. Off to the welder we go, but let us not forget to replace the upper lifelines that we broke to remove the stanchion.

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Finally all done and everything looks great thanks to the ease of Suncor lifeline kit.

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Well, off to the next project which is surely going to be another fun adventure.

Until next time,
Dennis

Is it a Poop Tank or a Water Tank?

Is it a poop tank or a water tank?

The previous owner told us this was the location of the poop tank. It had me fooled with the stench alone. Holy Hell!!!! It was that bad. After learning that this truly is the fresh water tank, well…..It needed a makeover. It got a good cleaning after it aired out some. and then the project began.

So, how do you access a 6’+ long water tank with one access port? Easy. Cut a hole in the floor and in the tank. Scrub her good and get to work.

Relining the water tank was the route I decided to take. I could buy food grade or rubber paint. Why spend money I didn’t have to when I already had a gallon of epoxy. I used West System epoxy resin. The smell wasn’t to bad and the project is complete. Although I did go home with epoxy stuck in my hair and  on my arms. Long gloves are in order for this project. Once I replace the water hoses the system will be good as new and hopefully trouble free for many years..

Until next time,
Dennis

 

Building it up

It’s been a little to cold and windy for my blood lately to do a lot of outdoor work. The latest has been the repair and reinforcing of the stantion gate bases since one suffered some serious damage which caused the fiberglass deck to crack. It wasn’t under our watch, but I’m sure it was a fun night! Maybe someone felt the need to test the strength of the lifelines or maybe someone was a little too tipsy or dare I say heavy, who knows? Anyway someone did a real shoddy job of repairing it afterwards as you can see. Pretty huh

Since there isn’t much room to work with on the inside, I decided to repair the area by constructing a large fiberglass backing plate that is permanently attached to the boat in hopes of never having to deal with this issue again. Grinding and two fiberglass layers later along with a generous gelcoat layer here it is! Almost felt like an art project at times with all the sculpting and shaping done in order to make it look decent. You want me to do what!!!!! Do the the other side too! Ok honey…… The fun never ends…….

Other than that, I am excited to say that some sanding has begun outside (but probably won’t continue much due to weather) in preparation for some paint. I’m getting tired of her looking as ugly as she does with the old pealing paint and all. She’s gonna look brand new by the time we are done! IMG_2726
Stay warm my friends.
Until next time,
Señora del Mar 

Hurricanes and Sailboats Oh My

Well, it was a lot of work, but we did our best to prepare the boat to give her the best chance of survival. Here is a list of what we did. Hopefully this may help you if you are faced with a  similar situation.

 

  • Removed roller furling head sail
  • Removed main sail
  • Removed boom
  • Removed anchor to prevent line chafe
  • Re-tightened all window screws
  • Checked bilge pump and lever
  • Removed solar panel
  • Shut down solar controller
  • Removed bimini and frame
  • Installed 2 new 5/8ths double braided rope
  • Secured anti chafing gear in place
  • Secured motor battery bank with tie down straps
  • Had a beer with a neighbor that is crazy enough to stay with his boat through the storm
  • Removed dinghy, scraped the bottom and stored her in the garage
The one thing I forgot and regret not doing is to turn the 2 dorades  (ventilation) to face back in the cockpit area. Water will more than likely enter here since there is no actual dorade box, just the pipes that lead directly to the inside back of the boat. Unfortunately it’s too late to take care of now.
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The rest is up to  God and Mother Nature. Wish us well…..
Prepared to weather the storm
Prepared to weather the storm